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Conringia orientalis

Conringia orientalis (L.) Dumort.

Brassica orientalis L.

Hare’s Ear Mustard

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassRosidaeRoses, legumes, proteas, dogwoods, hydrangeas, mistletoes, euphorbias, grapes, many more
OrderBrassicalesMustard, cabbage, caper, papaya, nasturtiums, many others; most produce mustard oil
FamilyBrassicaceaeMustards, cabbages
GenusConringiaNamed after Hermann Conring (1606-1681), a German professor and noted intellectual at the University of Helmstedt, Germany
SpeciesorientalisEastern (“the orient”)

About plant names...

Hare’s ear mustard is native to Europe and Asia. It is naturalized and widespread in North America, and is considered an invasive species in some areas, including central Canada. It is found in fields, roadsides, railroad beds, and waste areas.

Plants: Plants are erect annuals, growing 12-28" (30-70 cm).

Leaves: Leaves are thick, waxy-looking and pale green, ovate (an oval, wider at the stem end). The leaves clasp the stem. Basal leaves are oblanceolate to obovate, 1¾-3½" (5-9 cm). Upper leaves are oblong to elliptic or lanceolate.

Flowers: Flowers are in racemes of 10-25. Each flower is ⅜" (1 cm) around, whitish or pinkish, on a stalk (pedicel) up to ⅜" (1 cm) long. are tiny and white, with approximately 4 petals. About 7 greenish yellow-tipped stamens emerge like an asterisk from the flower center. Flowers appear from May to July.

Fruits: Beanlike siliquae are 3-6" (8-14 cm) long, usually four-angled.

Edibility: Toxic to livestock.

Online References:

Conringia orientalis on Wikimedia Commons

Conringia orientalis on the New England Wildflower Society’s GoBotany site

Conringia orientalis on Plants for a Future, a resource and information centre for edible and otherwise useful plants

Conringia orientalis on eFloras

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/7/2012 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Groton Center, Groton, MA
≈ 4½ × 7" (11 × 17 cm)

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/27/2016 · Acton Arboretum, Acton, MA

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/19/2017 · Beaver Brook Conservation Area, Brown Lane, Self-guided Nature Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 3½ × 4" (9.2 × 10 cm)

Conringia orientalis description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 12 Jul 2017.

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Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/16/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Groton Center, Groton, MA
≈ 4 × 4½" (10 × 11 cm) ID is uncertain

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/27/2016 · Acton Arboretum, Acton, MA

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/17/2013 · Gibbet Hill, Groton, MA
≈ 4 × 6" (10 × 14 cm)

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/27/2016 · Acton Arboretum, Acton, MA

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/19/2017 · Beaver Brook Conservation Area, Brown Lane, Self-guided Nature Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 4 × 6" (10 × 15 cm)

Conringia orientalis (Hare’s Ear Mustard)

5/16/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Groton Center, Groton, MA
≈ 3 × 4½" (7.9 × 11 cm) ID is uncertain

Range:

About this map...