FloraFinder.org
Home   About Us   Want to Help?   FAQ  
Searching   Image Use Biblio

Rosa rubiginosa

Rosa rubiginosa L.

Rosa eglanteria L. nom. utique rej.

Sweet-brier, Sweetbrier, Sweetbriar

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassRosidaeRoses, legumes, proteas, dogwoods, hydrangeas, mistletoes, euphorbias, grapes, many more
OrderRosalesRose family and eight others
FamilyRosaceaeIncludes apples, apricots, plums, cherries, peaches, pears, raspberries, strawberries, almonds, roses, meadowsweets, photinias, firethorns, rowans, and hawthorns; many others
GenusRosaFrom a Latin name so old its meaning is no longer known
SpeciesrubiginosaMeans “rusty”

About plant names...

Sweetbrier hails from Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia. It was introduced to North America prior to 1551, and has become naturalized here.

Plants: This shrub is 6½-9½' (2-3 m) high. Stems have many stout curved thorns (though not nearly as many as rugosa rose).

Leaves: Foliage smells like apples. Leaves are odd pinnate—occurring in clusters of 5 or 7 evenly sized opposite leaves with the odd leaf at the end of the branch. Individual leaves are about ½" (1.3 cm) long, oval, with double serrations.

Flowers: Loose clusters of one to eight, each 1-1½" (2.5-3.8 cm) around, pink or bright pink, with 5 petals.

Fruits: Up to ⅞" (2.5 cm) in diameter, bright red-orange, sometimes elongated into ovals.

See our wild rose comparison guide for further information.

Edibility: Although the fruit can be cooked and used for jam, it is a frustrating process, since the usable portion of the fruit is a thin layer above the seeds, and the seeds are encased in hairlike fibers that can irritate the mouth and digestive tract if accidentally eaten. Petals are edible if the bitter white bases are first removed. Young shoots are edible as well.

Online References:

Rosa rubiginosa on CalPhotos

Rosa rubiginosa on Turner Photographics' Wildflowers site

Rosa rubiginosa on Wikipedia

Rosa rubiginosa at the University of Wisconsin's Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium

Rosa rubiginosa on Plants for a Future, a resource and information centre for edible and otherwise useful plants

Rosa rubiginosa at the Missouri Botanical Garden

Rosa rubiginosa description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 24 Jul 2019.

© FloraFinder.org. All rights reserved.


 

Rosa rubiginosa (Sweet-brier, Sweetbrier, Sweetbriar)

9/25/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Groton, MA
≈ 3½ × 2½" (9.8 × 6.6 cm) ID is uncertain

Rosa rubiginosa (Sweet-brier, Sweetbrier, Sweetbriar)

8/28/2007 · Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park, Crescent City, CA
≈ 12 × 8" (29 × 19 cm) ID is uncertain

Rosa rubiginosa (Sweet-brier, Sweetbrier, Sweetbriar)

9/25/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Groton, MA
≈ 8 × 5" (19 × 13 cm) ID is uncertain

Rosa rubiginosa (Sweet-brier, Sweetbrier, Sweetbriar)

9/25/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Groton, MA
≈ 3½ × 2½" (9.8 × 6.6 cm) ID is uncertain

Range: Zones 4-9:

About this map...